12 Annoying Things That Smart Leaders Say

Words are powerful and can have a long-lasting effect on people…

Leaders are responsible for employee engagement, for setting goals, giving feedback and reinforce positive feedbacks.

Therefore, leaders have to be careful of the words that come out their mouth.

On one hand, they can say annoying things from time to time.

On the other hand, it’s not always easy to find the right thing to say.

Wondering what are the most annoying things that leaders usually say? 

12 Annoying Things That Smart Leaders Say #words #wordstolive by #leadership #leadershipskills #leadershipcompetencies journeytoleadershipblog.com

1. “It’s my way or the high way!”

Leaders who want everything they way tend to hire talented individuals to do the job but don’t trust them to do so or don’t give them the opportunity to exercise their expertise. By doing so, their team gradually lose confidence and morale.

2. “You’re wrong” or “Why didn’t you do this instead?”

There is more than one solution to a problem and there is more than one way than doing things.

3. “It’s none of your business” or “Stay in your lane”

Leaders who pull rank or hold back information try to retain power as much as they can and wish to establish a certain distance between themselves and their team.

4. “Let me finish…” or Interrupt people while the are talking…

It is important for leaders to actively listen before they speak and to value their team’s knowledge.

5. “I don’t pay you to think!”

By saying that, leaders reduce their team members to mere tools or objects.

6. “I’m not going to do your job for you” 

Team members usually come to leaders for advice and reassurance but don’t require those same leaders to do their job for them.

7. “Don’t waste my time”

Time is indeed a precious commodity but by saying that leaders impeded their team from suggesting innovative ideas.

8. “I don’t have time right now”

Leaders are definitely busy bodies but they make time for what is important.

9. “That’s not important…”

This statement has a tendency of devaluing team members.

10. “I don’t care” or “That’s not my problem”

Helping team members find solutions to problems is part of the job description of leaders.

11. “You are not as good as you think” or “You are lucky to even be here”

If a leader needs to remind a team member how great his or her job is then it is not that great to begin with.

12. “We have always done it that way”

Through that statement, leaders emphasize that there is no room for improvement or innovation.

Last words of advice!

When you have said a few annoying things, you can always recover by:

  • Being aware of your words.
  • Observing the impact of your words
  • Admitting your mistakes.
  • Calmly explaining yourself.
  • Letting go and moving on.

Hope that I’ve helped you get it together on your way to leadership!

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Quiet Girls Can Run the World : Owning Your Power When You’re Not the “Alpha” in the Room By Rebecca Holman

A good leader can either be an alpha or a beta woman.

The truth is that being an alpha or a beta leader doesn’t really matter and is just a way to box people in. 

Quiet Girls Can Run the World : Owning Your Power When You're Not the "Alpha" in the Room By Rebecca Holman #book #bookreviews #introversion #quietleadership #introvertedleader https://journeytoleadershipblog.com

1. The influence of popular culture and unconscious biases

Popular culture creates the definition of alpha and beta and shapes unconscious biases. 

In popular culture, women have been portrayed very differently. Movies have become critical in the opinions that women form of themselves and have about their ambitions and aspirations. 

Indeed, movies and popular culture create unconscious gender and racial biases in the workplace. 

On one hand, alpha women are all we see in the media world today. Alpha women are presumably in control, career driven and are not as lovable as beta women. They are either difficult, evil or unhappy.

On the other hand, beta women are supposedly not career-driven. They would use their job to fill a void until a man comes along to improve their lives.

In reality, beta women are not necessarily timid or introverted. They just don’t push their own agenda, intend to fit in at work and bypass their own ego. They also tend to reserve their opinion for themselves, give constructive criticism, and take time to make decisions. In addition,  they are emotionally intelligent, flexible, pragmatic and are able to work with different personality types. 

Most of the time, if the male counterparts watch these movies or conform to popular beliefs and if women don’t exhibit leadership traits as seen on TV, then they don’t believe that women possess any leadership traits. 

Furthermore, according to recent studies, alpha women who participate in meetings are seen as dominating when being dominating is a key component in alpha men leadership style. Beta men who are relaxed leaders are seen positively whereas beta women who exhibit the same trait are not even seen as leaders. 

To overcome these biases, popular culture needs to be updated.

2. Success for women in the workplace

As hard as it is to quantify success, both women and men generally get confused about what success really looks like.

Often, a job and the level of success are directly related to a personality even though the personality doesn’t do the job.

Women generally set the bar too high for themselves and are unable to emulate the standard of perfection. For instance, successful women are expected to be in charge of the room, of the conversation and meetings.  

Moreover, the only two women in the workplace are usually pitted against each other because men decided that there can only be one successful woman in the room. 

Before rushing towards success, women need to:

  • Understand what success actually looks like and take steps towards success.
  • Watch their presentation, protect their identity and don’t let their workplace define them.
  • Check the standards set by employers, themselves and others. 
  • Beat to the sound of their own drum.
  • Stay authentic. Authenticity allows you to retain a sense of self. Authenticity has allowed many people to achieve success and connect with others.
  • Take time to do nothing and don’t spread themselves thin. 

Review

Quiet Girls Can Run the World : Owning Your Power When You’re Not the “Alpha” in the Room by Rebecca Holman is exploring the various ways that women can deal with different types of environments without compromising their sense of self.

The roles of women in the workplace lack so much nuance. Rebecca Holman is attempting to figure out if beta women can be as successful as alpha women in the workplace by comparing the traits of alpha and beta women without placing one above the other. 

Quiet Girls Can Run the World : Owning Your Power When You’re Not the “Alpha” in the Room is also a hilarious guide on how to embrace who you are, how to find out what works for you without faking it, how to navigate office politics, various bosses without suppressing your identity, ambitions, needs and wants.

Being an alpha or beta leaders does not matter. What really matters is that you get to know yourself and what works for you.

Let me know below what you think about this book!

Favorite quote(s)

Success at work only looks one way. And a successful woman? She’s shouting louder than everyone else in the room. She’s stubborn and argumentative because these are signs that she’s passionate about the project at hand and cares about its success above all else. Ergo, she’s good at her job.

“the media is selling the idea that girls’ and women’s value lies in their youth, beauty, and sexuality and not in their capacity as leaders. Boys learn that their success is tied to dominance, power, and aggression. We must value people as whole human beings, not gendered stereotypes.”

It matters because women’s voices simply aren’t being heard on their own terms. Numerous studies have shown that women are interrupted far more often in meetings than men, as well as in the classroom—as a 2004 study from Harvard Law School demonstrated. And, according to a study by Princeton and Brigham Young University, if women talk 25–50 percent of the time in a professional meeting, they are seen as “dominating the conversation.

Similarly, studies show that while men in leadership positions are seen in a positive light when they demonstrate traditionally Alpha leadership traits (such as being decisive, dominating the conversation, being dogged and dogmatic in the pursuit of goals), women who demonstrate traditional Alpha leadership traits are viewed negatively by both men and women. And while men who have a more relaxed or Beta style of management are still seen in a positive light, female Beta managers aren’t considered at all—because Beta women can’t be managers. But why are we so unwilling to compare the relative merits of different personality types in female managers?

[…] our view of what a good leader looks like is limited, which can leave women feeling boxed in.

“Because, actually, if you’re looking at this volatile, complex, ambiguous world, where everything is so unpredictable, the only thing you can do is work on yourself and your own resilience to be able to cope and keep up and roll with the punches.”

How do you show the world how Alpha you are? You talk a lot and criticize everyone else. It’s a ruse as old as time (probably) and, often, it works. Most people are busy dealing with their own stuff, so they tend to assume that if people are busy dealing with their own stuff, so they tend to assume that if someone is vocal, self-assured, and sounds knowledgeable (read: has a loud voice), they must know what they’re talking about.

It’s hard to realize when you’re in an office environment that has a steep, sometimes toxic hierarchy how much time people spend trying to shore up their own positions, rather than focusing on the task at hand. When you grasp that the vast majority of office interactions are nothing to do with you, it can feel incredibly freeing.

And always remember the golden rule of office politics, which will stand you in good stead through most work crises: it’s not you, it’s them.

You just know as a black girl that you’re not allowed to be outspoken, you just know. When I had my first job, I worked for a magazine and I learned very quickly that the girls that were my age who were white were allowed to speak out. But when I did the same, there would be a throwaway comment like, ‘You don’t need to have that attitude.’ That was when I was twenty-one and I just learned very quickly that I’m not allowed to have the same sort of opinion as my white female counterparts.”

Ratings 3/5

Author

Rebecca Holman

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Leadership Secrets of the World’s Most Successful CEOs By Eric Yaverbaum

The best experts are the people who have both studied and experienced leadership. 

Only a CEO would know what it takes to become a successful leader…

Leadership Secrets of the World's Most Successful CEOs By Eric Yaverbaum

Below are the 25 best leadership advice and strategies to train yourself and steer you toward success.  

1. Seek out leadership experience because experience is the best teacher 

2. Become a people person

Essentially, becoming a people person consists in getting to know people on a personal level. 

3. Improve your listening and communication skills

Listening and communication skills are easily upgraded by connecting with people on a personal level, clearly communicating visions and values and holding regular meetings. 

4. Surround yourself with the right people

Leaders don’t suddenly possess all the knowledge in the world.

They have to rely on the expertise of their employees, delegate tasks and allow employees to come up with solutions to their problem. 

5. Put the right people in the right position 

6. Invest in employees personal success and well-being 

7. Treat your employees well

Your personal and organizational success depends on who well you treat your employees. In return, your employees will take better care of the customers and clients.  

8. Promote humane and holistic values

Leaders must be as humane and holistic as possible.

They understand that their employees are integral people with needs and wants. 

9. Actively manage your relationships

Help and support is always needed and can come from anywhere and anyone. 

10. Maintain healthy work-life balance for yourself and everyone else

11. Empower your employees

Leaders are enablers and facilitators.

They empower and help their team grow. 

In addition, they teach people how to be successful and how to take risks. 

12. Rally everyone around a common goal 

13. Embrace change and use it to your benefit

14. Infuse your vision into the culture

15. Be quick to recognize opportunities and challenges

16. Have a greater sense of purpose

17. Learn to make sound and ethical decisions

18. Avoid following conventional wisdom

19. Always plan and focus on the most important priorities

20. Be passionate about what you do and have fun when you do it

21. Learn continually

Leaders continually ask questions. Most leaders learn to be good learners by working for good leaders. 

22. Practice, practice, practice

Leaders can be trained and find ways to practice their skills on a daily. 

23. Be open to feedback 

24. Innovate

Leaders stay on the brink of innovation and know how to articulate their ideas.

25. Rely on core values

Leaders have strong sets of core values that are the organization mission statement, set the standard, set the premise for all processes and sip into the culture. 

Review

Leadership Secrets of the World’s Most Successful CEOs by Eric Yaverbaum is a self-help book that gathers the experience of successful CEOs and that shares invaluable leadership lessons.

There are many characteristics that make leaders be great such as authenticity, honesty and kindness. In Leadership Secrets of the World’s Most Successful CEOs, Eric Yaverbaum essentially states that great leaders can be trained.

According to him, leaders are people who generally have a multitude of skills but who are mostly service-oriented and people-oriented.

Indeed, every advice and leadership strategy is aimed to develop the steadiest and most effective leader. Every advice and leadership startegy is geared towards employee well-being and relationship building.

Leaders are not self-centered. They must always be focused on how they make other people feel and how they can move them towards a unique and common goal.   

Let me know below what you think about this book!

Favorite quote(s)

There’s an old saying: “Give a man a fish, feed him for a day; teach a man to fish, feed him for a lifetime”.
There are so many characteristics that make a person a good leader: a leader should be authentic, a listener, stand for values, lead by example, be honest, provide direction, and—most important—be daring, take risks, and develop and empower others. This combination of techniques is what makes a true leader.
If you are not a “born leader”, you can develop your leadership abilities through training and experience

Ratings 3.5/5

Author

Eric Yaverbaum

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Eric Yaverbaum

Meet the author #author #biography #book #books #bookreviews #leadership journeytoleadershipblog.comEric Yaverbaum is the CEO of Ericho Communications, a communications, media, and public relations expert.

Eric Yaverbaum is also the best-selling author of Leadership Secrets of the World’s Most Successful CEOs.Digiprove sealCopyright secured by Digiprove © 2021

Leadership Vs Management: 6 Differences That Set Them Apart

Every leader has their own leadership style and every manager their own management style.

Managers tend to manage goals, budgets, deadlines, clients, people and projects.

Whereas, leaders influence, empower, guide a team or a group of people towards a specific vision.

Most for the time, these terms are used interchangeably. 

Sometimes, the line between managers and leaders get blurred because both leaders and managers have to make sure that their teams are successful and that their organization benefit from their intervention.   

Wondering whether are the traits that set managers and leaders apart?

Leadership Vs Management: 6 Differences That Set Them Apart #leadership #leadershipskills #leadershipcompetencies https://journeytoleadershipblog.com

 

1. Short-term vs Long-term z

Managers oversee the short-term metrics, execute tasks and help others execute tasks in order to reach these metrics. 

On the contrary, leaders pay attention to long-term goals, overall progress and drive change.

2. Problem-oriented vs Solution-oriented

Managers punctually correct mistakes and set people back on track. 

Leaders value growth and provide solutions so that their team don’t make the same mistakes.

3. Task-oriented vs. People-oriented

On one hand, managers are task-oriented individuals. They encourage their team to achieve each tasks and reach each goals.

On the other hand, leaders are people-oriented. They delegate tasks and trust that their team will achieve them.

4. Trust building vs Team building

Managers build team-cohesion and motivate people to do their job.

However, leaders build trust, motivate and encourage others to contribute to the team and to the organization.

5. Title vs Exemplarity

Managerial roles usually come with a title and expect team members to individually take care of their problems. 

Leaders are able to do the opposite and to lead without a title. Leaders lead by example, advice their team and transform problems into solutions. 

6. Maintaining culture vs Building culture

Managers impregnate themselves with the company culture and the vision for the organization. They help their team members align themselves with the principles of the organization and to maintain the company culture. 

Contrarily, leaders have purpose, have a vision, core beliefs for themselves and their organization that they are able to share with their team. They build the culture. 

Last Words Of Advice!

Leadership and management are not mutually exclusive.

Sometimes, managers and leaders have overlapping yet critical roles.

Furthermore, there is no right or wrong way to lead or to manage:

  • Everybody is different and has a personal approach to dealing with other people.
  • Everybody has to figure out at some point how they want to be handled and how they wish to handle people, whether or not a managerial or leadership is more suitable. 

Are you a manager or a leader? 

Hope that I’ve helped you get it together on your way to leadership!

Don’t forget to like, share and leave a comment below.

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6 Timeless Books That Every Leader Should Read

We are currently living in uncertain times…

We find ourselves developing new habits in an effort to adapt to changing circumstances and look towards more stable institutions.

The advice contained in these books demonstrate how to thrive as a leader in uncertain times, have stood the test of time, are collection of fundamental principles of leadership and of success.

Below is our selection of 6 timeless leadership books that every leader needs to read !

6 Timeless Books That Every Leader Should Read #books #bookreviews #leadershipbooks #reading #bookreviewer #bookblogger #bookaddict  #booklovers #bookaholic #bookrecommendation #bookclub #reviews #bookreader https://journeytoleadershipblog.com

1. The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People by Stephen R. Covey

The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People by Stephen R. Covey is one of the most classic book on leadership that divulges pragmatic guiding principles.

Stephen R. Covey encourages people to create habits to helps them face obstacles, master themselves, grow consistently professionally and personally.

2. The Coaching Habit: Say Less, Ask More & Change the Way You Lead Forever by Michael Bungay Stanier

The Coaching Habit: Say Less, Ask More & Change the Way You Lead Forever by Michael Bungay Stanier is all  about asking more questions and talking less are ways to become a better leader.

Indeed, the loudest voice in the room is not necessarily the best leader or the only leader in the room.

Michael Bungay Stanier suggests 7 hard questions to help leaders unlock their true potential, to coach themselves and their team.

3. Leaders Eat Last — Why Some Teams Pull Together and Others Don’t by Simon Sinek

Leaders Eat Last — Why Some Teams Pull Together and Others Don’t by Simon Sinek defines the greatest qualities of leadership.

For Simon Sinek, in order to be successful, leaders have to sacrifice themselves for the benefit of the team and create a healthy company culture.

A healthy company culture is an environment where trust is central, where employees can collaborate, develop their knowledge, are able to conquer anything, become leaders themselves and do remarkable things.

4. Developing the Leader Within You by John C. Maxwell

In Developing the Leader Within You, John C. Maxwell introduces us to the 11 internal shifts or Leadershifts that leaders should implement in order to achieve career advancement and real success.

For John C. Maxwell, leaders are continual learners, they learn from everyone and everything.

They get out of their comfort zone, know how to get information and are selective with the information they intake.

5. The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership: Follow Them and People Will Follow by John C. Maxwell

In The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership: Follow Them and People Will Follow, John C. Maxwell shares and explains the 21 rules on effective leadership.

Thanks to these irrefutable laws, leaders are able to learn, apply what they learn, attract talent, manage and lead teams, and plan their legacy ahead of time.

6. How to Win Friends & Influence People by Dale Carnegie

How to Win Friends & Influence People illustrates different ways to build healthy relationships.

According to Dale Carnegie, leaders are those who are able to communicate effectively with their team, promote, persuade, empower and influence others.

Last Words Of Advice!

These of the most famous and most classic books on leadership.

Each anecdote, principle, and sentiment remain true to this day.

These books will not create instantaneous change within yourself but will gradually change your perspective on life and encourage you to pursue continual learning.

Hope that I’ve helped you get it together on your way to leadership!

Don’t forget to like, share and leave a comment below.

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13 Leadership Tips For Your First Day On The Job

Congratulations. You have just been hired, after an incessant job search and multiple job interviews.

Now, the real work has just started!

Wondering how to build a positive professional image as soon as you arrive on the job and to sustain it throughout your whole career?

13 Leadership Tips for Your First Day on the Job #work #career #careeradvice #job #leadership #success From your first day on the job, your colleagues will definitely be judging you and your capabilities as a leader, as a team member or as a threat to their current position.

Meanwhile your employer will evaluate your abilities to integrate the organization and to quickly adapt, to learn the job skills. You have to be ready to handle the pressure and to measure up to the job.

And unfortunately, I learnt that there aren’t any do-overs when it comes to making a first impression of your professional image.

On the first day on my first job, I showed up on the first day with a negative attitude: I was anxious, unconsciously rejecting the fact that I had to work corporate and work for someone else.

Therefore, in the long haul, I started involuntarily rebuffing the idea of getting along with people, learning new skills and focusing on my job.

As a result, I integrated an unfavorable perception of my environment and I certainly believe that I left a negative impression of myself in the workplace.

This stuck to me for a while until I quit the job and was able to start over elsewhere with a better knowledge of both corporate and leadership. At the same time, to survive, I did what my elders told me: “work hard and keep your head down!”.  But this brought on additional issues.

Why? Because, according to Daniel Goleman, in Working With Emotional Intelligence,  the “rules for work are changing. We’re being judged by a new yardstick: not just by how smart we are, or by our training and expertise, but also by how well we handle ourselves and each other.[…] These rules have little to do with what we were told was important in school; academic abilities are largely irrelevant to this standard.”.

In order for you to steer clear from the same issues that I have experienced, to develop a leadership image from the start, follow the tips below:

1. Arrive to work early and leave late on your first day

Arriving early to work demonstrate your motivation, your eagerness to learn and gives you more credit as a professional.

In addition, arriving early will allow you to get a general feel of your new colleagues’ arrival time, schedules, morning procedures.

It will also give you a time to which you will be expected to show up at work.

On your first day, at least, make sure to leave the office after a few coworkers have left the office and not before everyone else does.

2. Dress appropriately and to look your best

Undeniably, your coworkers will make snap decisions about you without getting to know or understanding your core values.

Subsequently, they will judge your book by its cover, no matter how you feel or what you say.

Dressing appropriately, without drawing attention to yourself,  gives the perception that you fit in, that you are the right person for the job, and that you care about yourself and others.

At your job interview, you had the time to consider the company culture and to take notes on the proper attire to fit in.

Even on casual Fridays, groom yourself, do your best to look the part, and to dress for  the job you want and not for the one you have.

3. Be confident, positive and prepared for a full-blown interview from your colleagues

After the job interview, take heed of the coworkers interviews.

Most likely, they will ask about your education, your professional experience, your professional competencies for the job, a description of your current position, and the members of your team. Prepare a short presentation of yourself to introduce yourself confidently.

4. Assume also that some of your coworkers won’t bother to get to know you

So, you will have to take initiative and make the first steps.

Extend a firm handshake, smile and proactively introduce yourself by using the short presentation about yourself and to control the message regarding yourself.

Also, prepare a set of probing questions for your coworkers.

5. Observe your coworkers in return, their behavior towards one another, towards their boss

Don’t be fooled, on your first day, most of your coworkers will be on their best behavior around you and will try their best for you to like them.

Withal, you can discreetly notice the clicks and the areas and subjects that bring tension.

6. Pay attention to company culture

Who gives orders, who is the unofficial leader, who arrives early and who arrives late, who takes coffee breaks and how often, who start the lunch process, where lunch takes place and for how long…does everyone work out? Should you go to the after works?

Take a moment to understand the rules, on your own, without referring to any coworker just yet.

7. Remember the names of the people you meet

I am not a name person but you should not ask for names that were already given. Wait a few days and someone will throw a name out there.

8. Cultivate emotional intelligence

Even though your coworkers will be on their best behavior for the first few days, there is ALWAYS someone to come around and test you for fun.

Your reaction to his or her obnoxious behavior will market your capabilities and your personal qualities, for future career success.

9. Communicate effectively, listen more than you speak and observe your body language

Listen actively and with intention of asking probing questions. Ask for people opinions before you give yours.

10. Show interest in your new tasks

The responsibilities that you are given on your first days are boring and minimal: you will most likely be reading job regulations, technical documents and implementing basic tasks.

Nonetheless, ask pertinent questions, take notes, commit to the task at hand and don’t expect your boss or your coworkers to hold your hand.

11. Be open to correction, advice and guidance

Even though you have some experience under your belt, stay humble instead of showing off your knowledge, listen to what your coworkers have to tell you

Thank people for their help and own up to your mistakes. Don’t be afraid to say “I don’t know. Let me find out and get back to you.”.

12. Accept invitations for coffee, to smoke or to lunch with your coworkers

Mind you, I don’t drink coffee, I don’t smoke and I only take lunch breaks alone during my working hours.

But those breaks are essential to show that you are social and willing to integrate and share their habits.

Use those breaks to your advantage to get to know your coworkers.

13. Don’t indulge in office politics and gossip on your first day or ever

Avoid people who partake in gossip and employ aggressive methods of office politics.

To not be implicated in the rumor mill, don’t expose your personal life. According to Daniel Goleman, pay attention to “what to say, what not to say, and what to call it” throughout your entire career.

Last Words Of Advice!

Building a strong professional image and leader brand, as soon as you step into your new position, is detrimental to career success.

Hope that I’ve helped you get it together on your way to leadership! Don’t forget to like, share and leave a comment below.

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15 Hateful Coworkers and How to Deal with Them

We all have been exposed during a period of time to annoying, hateful, toxic coworkers that can drive us crazy.

Sometimes, bringing us to ask ourselves whether they’re the problem or we are…

Wondering how to spot these toxic coworkers from afar and how to handle them?

15 Hateful Coworkers and How to Deal with Them #toxiccoworkers #leadership #leadershipdevelopment https://journeytoleadershipblog.com Every workplace has difficult employees and we all have been, to some extent, in different situations with hateful coworkers.

I do believe that we all, partially or fully, demonstrate some level of toxicity towards a third party in the workplace.

Below, are the 15 worst toxic coworkers that I have already met and have had to deal with.

Case Study #1: ​The Delicate

Key Symptoms

The Delicate is a sensitive person with vain imagination that constantly and easily feels under attack, and that takes things deeply and personally. The Delicate thinks that people are looking, gossiping and criticizing him or her!

Treatment

  • Keep the conversation on superficial topics and crack jokes about him or her.
  • Avoid using sarcasm, making dry remarks, directly confronting this person. Instead, try to sugarcoat things and to give indirect constructive criticism.

Case Study #2: The Slacker

Key Symptoms

The Slacker is mostly concerned about personal life and regulating it during working hours.

The Slacker does not take his or her work seriously, spends his or her working life over the internet, cannot make a deadline to save his or her life, is not punctual even absent, unapologetically displays a lack of motivation.

The Slacker is visibly unfulfilled in his or her current position but won’t do anything about it.

Treatment

  • Impose a deadline or better yet let him or her publicly impose a deadline.
  • Pick up the slack with the rest of the team and keep quiet.
  • This individual will sink himself or herself. Otherwise, this individual will eventually have to get up and swim, explain their behavior, their performance and their results to upper management.

Case Study #3: The Rocket Scientist

Key Symptoms

The Rocket Scientist is the individual on the team that is full of knowledge but who is in search for recognition for his superior intellect and who demands an immense respect for his expertise. The Rocket Scientist will feel insulted and will almost become passive aggressive if his or her ideas and point of view are being questioned.

Treatment

  • Stop comparing his expertise to anyone on the team.
  • Avoid diminishing his knowledge and ideas in front of the team or behind closed doors.
  • Avoid criticizing his work and intellect.
  • Instead, tap into his range of knowledge by placing him or her in the role of a counselor but not a decision maker.

Case Study #4: The Gossiper

Key Symptoms

The Gossiper is an individual that enjoys gossip, that emphasizes and embellishes a rumor.

The Gossiper is nosy and loves to keep the rumor mill spinning. This person is even capable of destroying someone’s reputation in the office.

Treatment

  • Listen to the rumor without adding any input. The information may not be malicious but indicative of office politics or of a situation that you can take advantage of.
  • However, learn to separate useful information from the gossip.
  • If this person only brings negative void information, crafted gossip, signal your disinterest by not responding or responding with monosyllables or challenging the facts in the story line, discreetly remove yourself from the circle, avoid participating in the rumor mill.
  • Be careful not to offense this person, for they would drag your name in the mud. If this person is actually gossiping about you, avoid any interaction and adding fuel to fire by striking back with gossip before damaging your reputation.
  • Confront this person in a non threatening and diplomatic way, in a private setting by stating that you are aware of the gossip and everyone is saying that she is a liar and the bearer of the negative information but you know that is not true.

Case Study #5: The Bulldozer

Key Symptoms

The Bulldozer is an individual that believes wrongly in his intelligence.

The Bulldozer doesn’t hesitate to make everybody’s life miserable if things don’t go his way.

The Bulldozer threatens, bullies, intimidates, steps on toes and remains on the verge of harassment in order to get things his way. “It’s my way or the high way!”. The Bulldozer imposes his way of doing things even if it is not the best way of doing them.

They make the worst managers ever but are the most common managers found in corporate.

Treatment

  • Cultivate your emotional intelligence in order not to respond to negativity with negativity.
  • listen to this person point of view from beginning to end without uttering a word, then summarize their position and calmly expose yours.

Case Study #6: The Work-To-Rule

Key Symptoms

The Work-To-Rule discards any part of responsibility in a situation, does not understand tram work and does exactly what is stated in their contracts and no more. In fact, the Work-To-Rule insists on not taking on more responsibilities than his or her job description.

Treatment

  • Stress the importance of team work and the value of this individual contribution at work.

Case Study #7: The Overly Friendly

Key Symptoms

The Overly Friendly is an individual that thinks that his coworkers are his extended family and that doesn’t mind sharing extra personal details of his or her life. These details will make you uncomfortable.

Treatment

Explain that you don’t want to hear the gruesome details of his or her life. If his or her behavior are too intimate, it can be considered as harassment and can be reported to human resources.

Case Study #8: The Naysayer

Key Symptoms

The Naysayer is an individual that irritatingly pinpoints everything negative in a situation and predicts problems before they happen, without proposing an alternative and constructive solution to the situation at hand.

Treatment

Position that person in roles that require to see problems before they occur. No need to argue and show the positive side of an idea. To inhibit this behavior, request an explanation why the situation would not work and a thought-through plan for the solution

Case Study #9: The Blameshifter

Key Symptoms

The Blameshifter is an individual that points the finger at everyone else but themselves and that comes up with very creative excuses to completely remove the blame from themselves.

It is a form of narcissism: the Blameshifter is afraid of confronting themselves.

Treatment

  • Come prepared with evidence.
  • If the blame is pointed at you and you know that it is not your fault, give proof of your innocence without accusing this individual.
  • If this individual comes to you with an object of complaint on someone else, in order to avoid being put in the middle, claim that this is none of your business and suggest that they have a conversation with the alleged culprit.

15 Hateful Coworkers and How to Deal with Them

Case Study #10: The Neophobe

Key Symptoms

The Neophobe is an individual that doesn’t deal well with change.

The Neophobe is capable of refusing it, sabotaging it or even halting it.

Treatment

  • Demonstrate to him or her that change isn’t traumatic and can be positive.
  • Provide proof and facts that the change eminent is positive.
  • Help that person embrace change.

Case Study #11: The Chatterbox

Key Symptoms

The Chatterbox is an individual that drops by your workspace and starts chatting without solicitation about anything and everything.

This individual does not necessarily partake in gossip, but volunteers to share their point of view. This individual tends to makes you unproductive and inefficient.

Treatment

  • Avoid using words of exclamation or affirmation to not encourage this person to keep on talking.
  • Avoid making eye contact when this person is passing through.
  • Politely and respectfully explain that you are on schedule.

Case Study #12: The Martyr

Key Symptoms

The Martyr is a dedicated employee, willing to “die” for their company without being asked to do so, and that searches for recognition and validation. For example, the Martyr does extra hours at work and manipulate the boss when someone else get a promotion.

Treatment

  • Show appreciation for this employee and value their work within the company.

Case Study #13: The Stealer

Key Symptoms

The Stealer constantly steals coworkers ideas, takes credit for them and denies it when confronted.

Treatment

  • Hold back on your ideas and opinions when having a conversation with this individual. Listen more than you speak.
  • Avoid confronting this fool but bite your tongue instead because he or she might not know how to implement your ideas.
  • Don’t report it to upper management before appearing to be salty.

Case Study #14: The Snake

Key Symptoms

The Snake is an overly ambitious — almost sociopathic — coworker that smiles to your face and that stabs you and everyone else in the back. The Snake will claim that your ideas are wonderful but will degrade them when you are not looking.

Treatment

  • Keep your personal information, brilliant ideas to yourself.
  • Listen more than you speak.
  • Stay socially engaged and involved in office politics.

Case Study #15: The Ultra Competitive

Key Symptoms

The Ultra Competitive is an individual that is prepared to step over your dead body to succeed or to get recognition in the workplace.

Treatment

  • Focus on your work or get involve in a project where the Ultra Competitive person is not involved in.
  • Stay socially engaged with your other coworkers and keep networking.
  • Consider the company culture, compare them to your values and figure out whether or not you fit in.

How do I deal with other difficult personalities?

Last Words Of Advice!

Toxic coworkersMost coworkers use extreme tactics to get advancements in the workplace and would do anything to trigger you, to demean you or sabotage your own progress. Some take job positions where they do not belong and that they cannot handle. Others are misusing their strengths and transforming them into flaws that are not accepted in the environment they choose to work in. Others are even responding to an already toxic workplace. Lastly some coworkers are oblivious to their visible flaws and practice them outside of work. In order to deal with other toxic coworkers:

  • cultivate emotional intelligence,
  • listen more than you speak,
  • look for the positive or the humour in negative circumstances.

No matter the reasons, you have to learn how to insulate yourself emotionally and spot a hateful coworker from a distance.

Hope that I’ve helped you get it together on your way to leadership!

Don’t forget to like, share and leave a comment below.  

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Phil M. Jones

Meet the author #author #biography #book #books #bookreviews #leadership journeytoleadershipblog.comPhil M. Jones is a motivational speaker, leadership and business growth expert.

Phil M. Jones is also the author of Exactly What To Say: The Magic Words For Influence and Impact.Digiprove sealCopyright secured by Digiprove © 2021

6 Famous Principles For Effective Task Management

In our daily rush and in a constant desire to produce, we often find ourselves multitasking, overworked, stressed out, pretending to be busy but not completing any task.

Below are six principles of task management to help you finish what you started.

Wondering which Principles to use in order to manage your tasks effectively?

6 Famous Principles For Effective Task Management #management #productivity #taskmanagement #timemanagement #leadership #journeytoleadership journeytoleadershipblog.com

1. The Pareto Principle

In 1906, Pareto realized that 20% of the population made up 80% of the revenue.
Then, he also noticed that these statistics also applied to work productivity. Indeed, in the workplace, 20% of the work produced generates 80% of the desired results.

That is why the Pareto Principle, better known as the 80/20 Principle or the Law of the Vital Few, encourages you to focus on essentials tasks, prioritize your activities, avoid those that are not beneficial to you and learn how to say no.

2. The Parkinson Principle

In 1958, Professor Cyril North-Cote Parkinson understood that a task will take up all the attributed time for it’s realization.

In ther words, the Parkinson Principle or the Dilatation Principle affirms that even if we have the ample time to achieve a task, we will use up all that given time.

That is why it is necessary to break up tasks into smaller ones and create your own deadlines.

3. The Law Of Murphy

According to Murphy, a US Air Force Engineer, a task always takes up more time than expected and that whatever could go wrong will go wrong.

Consequently, you must expect the unexpected, anticipate problems, add buffers between meetings, and overestimate the time needed on any task you take on even if you are good at it.

4. The Laborit Principle

If we listened to ourselves, there is no doubt in my mind that we would always do what makes us happy and complete the easiest tasks first.

We would therefore tackle the ones who require the least effort and neglect the hard and stressful ones.

However, handling the most difficult tasks first require extreme self-discipline but is the most rewarding task management strategy.

5. The Carlson Principle

In the 1950s, Professor Sune Carlson measured the number of time managers were being interrupted in average on a daily basis.

It turns out that they were interrupted every 20 minutes and were not able to effectively tend to their tasks because it took them time to focus back on their task at hand.

Carlson concluded that a task handled without interruptions or distractions is done faster than when it is done otherwise.

If you have an opening door policy, you may want to create strong boundaries to make time for your activities and reduce interruptions.

6. The Illich Principle

Ivan Illich, an ecologist thinker, states that beyond a certain amount of time spent on a task, our effectiveness and focus tend to diminish.

Due to that fact, it becomes vital to know and accept our own limitations, and to take regular breaks in order to recharge ourselves.

Last Words Of Advice!

The clutter on your desk also takes up mental space, create a sense of being busy and overwhelmed without you actually being productive.

It then becomes important to unclutter as much as possible and set things at their place.

Hope that I’ve helped you get it together on your way to leadership!

Don’t forget to like, share and leave a comment below.

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