9 Office Rules That Kill Productivity

In the workplace, rules and common practices are necessary to create order, maintain standards, increase productivity, solve punctual problems or improve the image of the company… 

Most rules are fundamentals principles of life and go without saying. However, some rules are too restrictive and damage the general morale.

Subsequently, productivity suffers, company culture worsens and employees resentment and mental load increase.

Wondering what are the rules that kill workplace productivity?

9 Office Rules That Kill Productivity

1. Hiring on bias and first impressions rule

I have been to  interviews where your first impression controls the whole interviews.

Companies want to hire the most competent applicants who will fit the company culture. 

Some companies or hiring personnel tend to hire one type of people and miss out on great applicants because of hearsay, bias, first impressions and their system of beliefs.

People value companies that believe in diversity.

2. Hiring over a keyword search

These days, the hiring process is done over the internet using keyword search algorithms. This practice leads to hiring personnel contacting applicants who have nothing o do with the position.

3. No individuality

Most companies have a pack mentality. To build a cohesive image, they require a strict dress code and a certain level of decorum from their employees.

However, people can be ethical and should have enough liberty to express themselves at a minimum. They should be able display personal items and wear the clothes that they want.

4. No communication tools

Some companies ban the use of cell phones and regulate the use of internet. However, these practices are antiquated and will not retain millennial employees.

Some companies fail to see that technology is a new way of life and has become necessary. For example, to do their jobs appropriately, employees surf the internet for advice, for tutorials or need to stay connected with their families and other professionals.

Furthermore, every employee handle their break differently: some go to the bathroom for some quiet time, some like to get the gossip at the water cooler, some enjoys conversing over coffee, some make a phone call and others simply enjoy staying at their desk browsing social media.

Sure, there are definitely some sites that are inappropriate for the work environment and that need restriction.Sure, spending more time on the internet and on your cell phone that you do on your job is unprofessional.

For the most part, the internet and cell phones are great communication tools and can improve productivity. Like everything else, they should be used in moderation. 

5. No Bathroom Breaks

Now, that’s a counterproductive rule!

In a day, you cannot predict or control how many times and how long someone will have to go to the bathroom. Limiting bathroom break goes against basic human rights.

6. No time off

Nowadays, people value companies who allow telecommuting and provide flexible hours. 

Most professionals don’t need to be told at what time to show up to work and how long they should stay.

People generally want to honor their time at work. They should be able to regulate their own hours and take time off when they need it.

Cutting the salary of someone who is a few minutes late just seems petty.

7. No autonomy

We live in an age where team work makes the dream work and is mandatory to get a job.

However, most people value autonomy and tend to work alone at their desk anyways.

Forcing people to collaborate will most of the time breed conflict and often times reduce productivity.

8. No meetings

Unless there is an urgent matter to discuss, meetings are generally pointless and kill overall productivity.

Some companies schedule weekly meetings where you have to endlessly listen to people who are not adding value to the conversation and are not solving the problem, if there is even a problem to be solve.

9. Performance review rule

Feedback is constructive criticism and can improve productivity.

However, performance review makes people uncomfortable because they tend to:

  • Evaluate performance using an inaccurate list of criteria.
  • Bring employees back to their student day and make them feel like a number.
  • Generate the fear of being judged, getting fired or speaking up. 

Last Words Of Advice!

Employees have to remember that they have signed a contract, trading their time and effort for salary. If they are not honoring that contract, they must assume the consequences.

In addition, leaders who often break the rules themselves have to acquire the skills to deal with employees  who underperform or who violate general work ethics.

It’s all about trust, common sense and giving people a sense of freedom.

 

 

Hope that I’ve helped you get it together on your way to leadership!

Don’t forget to like, share and leave a comment below.

 

 

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